PaperGirl Newswire: A Wedding Review

posted in: Day In The Life, Family, Luv 7
The bride and groom at the reception. Photo: Me.

 

 

ATLANTA, Ga. — Choosing flowers is tough. There are many options for photography. But if you’re getting married in Atlanta in almost-July, the wedding party favor is easy: Give ’em paper fans.

At half-past four in the afternoon, with the temperature in the high 80s, around 100 stylish guests on wooden chairs fanned themselves, waiting for the backyard ceremony to begin. Then, as family and close friends snapped a few more pictures of the lavish chuppah constructed entirely from twigs woven together with ribbon and fresh flowers, the three-piece band quietly closed out their rendition of “Love Me Tender” and switched gears.

All eyes turned toward the upper patio. And the bride descended the stairs. 

Resplendent in an elegantly tailored, bone-colored peplum gown, it was confirmed by several official science sources that the bride was actually “glowing from within.” Ruddy-cheeked and radiant, her mane of thick, dark hair was worn pinned back on one side and topped with a feathered fascinator. Several official fashion sources said that her look was “pitch perfect,” and “timeless, but with sass for days.”

The bride’s mother (ageless!) and father (peerless!) greeted their daughter there in the family backyard and helped move her toward the aisle. Tears were shed by all members of the family and every single person in the tent, including the author, was blubbing and sniffing and sticking to our chairs in that heat and it was magical and perfect. 

The groom — an adorably rumpled, Swedish artist — wore a powder blue linen suit and looked in wonder as his flawless bride approached the altar. Several official relationship sources confirmed that he looked like he was definitely taking this seriously and that he was “a good one.” The rabbi leading the nuptials hit just the right note in those remarks he gave in English. (As the author does not speak Hebrew, all remarks given by the rabbi in Hebrew cannot be confirmed as hitting the right note, but an official religious source was overheard to be saying that everything went just fine.)

Once the vows were spoken and the ceremonial wineglass was stomped, the band played a jazzy rendition of Guns n’ Roses’s classic, “Sweet Child O’ Mine” as the newlyweds made their exit. As the wedding party sat for portraits off-site, guests were treated to glasses of champagne and small, nibbly things like chocolate-covered strawberries and fancy cheese on fancy toothpicks. It was confirmed by several gastronomically-inclined sources that “the canapé situation [was] excellent, just excellent.”

Then it was off to the country club for dinner and dancing. And the author had an allergy attack (or something??) and had to leave early. But everything was so perfect. And you got married, Bari. And you got married, Magnus. And I got to see that, and see all the people who love you.

Congratulations.

7 Responses

  1. Liz Flaherty
    | Reply

    Sweet! I love the picture, too.

  2. Margaret VanBrunt
    | Reply

    Love the way you have w/words. You paint a perfect picture. “Official sources”. Brilliant

  3. Melanie
    | Reply

    I feel as if I was there. Your descriptions are thorough and ideal. 🙂

  4. Sally Nesser
    | Reply

    Well that was fun!! Almost felt like I was there. It is very hard to not cry at a wedding unless you don’t have a pulse. Tears of happiness are the best kind.
    If the Quilt thing doesn’t work out Mary? There is the NYTs Sunday wedding review.

  5. Cathy
    | Reply

    Sounds like a good time (except for your allergic issue?!)! The bride is cleary related to you as there is a resemblance! What a cute pic of them and your description of the festivities was great fun to read!!!

  6. Claire Sherman
    | Reply

    I’d love to see a photo of the chuppah if you have one. It sounds like a wonderful wedding!

  7. Liam
    | Reply

    Hi, Mary! I liked the pose of the bride, she probably introducing you? 😉

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